Title

Departmental report on performance

A ship pulling up to an offshore installation.

Annual performance statements

Introductory statement

I, Glenys Beauchamp, as the accountable authority of the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science, present the 2015–16 annual performance statements of the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science, as required under paragraph 39(1)(a) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act). In my opinion, these annual performance statements accurately present the department’s performance in the reporting period and comply with subsection 39(2) of the PGPA Act.

Glenys Beauchamp
14 September 2016

Vision and purposes

The department’s vision is to enable growth and productivity for globally competitive industries. The department works towards the vision through three purposes:

  • Purpose 1: Supporting Science and Commercialisation
  • Purpose 2: Growing Business Investment and Improving Business Capability
  • Purpose 3: Streamlining Regulation

The department works in partnership with a large number of stakeholders, including other Australian Government agencies, state and territory governments, local governments, businesses, industries, researchers, scientific agencies and the wider Australian community.

Performance reporting structure

The department’s annual performance statements use the purpose and activity structure set out in the 2015–16 Corporate Plan, with slight modifications. This is partly to reflect the machinery of government changes that affected the department in the reporting period, particularly the incorporation of responsibility for northern Australia policy and coordination.

The reporting structure is broadly consistent with the structure set out in the 2015–16 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS) and the 2015–16 Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements (PAES), as shown in Table 2.

Table 2: Mapping of the 2015–16 Annual Performance Statements to the 2015–16 Portfolio Budget Statements, the 2015–16 Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements and the 2015–16 Corporate Plan
2015–16 Portfolio Budget Statements and 2015–16 Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements 2015–16 Annual Performance Statements 2015–16 Corporate Plan
Outcome 1:
Enabling growth and productivity for globally competitive industries through supporting science and commercialisation, growing business investment and improving business capability and streamlining regulation
Vision:
Enabling growth and productivity for globally competitive industries
Vision:
Enabling growth and productivity for globally competitive industries
Programme 1:
Supporting Science and Commercialisation
Purpose 1:
Supporting Science and Commercialisation
Purpose:
Supporting Science and Commercialisation
Sub-programme 1.1: Science awareness, infrastructure and international engagement Activity 1.1: Science awareness, infrastructure and international engagement Activity: Science awareness, infrastructure and international engagement
Sub-programme 1.2: Business research, development and commercialisation Activity 1.2: Business research, development and commercialisation Activity: Business research, development
and commercialisation
Programme 2:
Growing Business Investment
and Improving Business Capability
Purpose 2:
Growing Business Investment
and Improving Business Capability
Purpose:
Growing Business Investment and Improving Business Capability
Sub-programme 2.1: Competitive marketplace Activity 2.1: Competitive marketplace Activity: Competitive marketplace
Sub-programme 2.2: Business and market development Activity 2.2: Business and market development Activity: Business and market development
Sub-programme 2.3: Economic transition Activity 2.3: Economic transition Activity: Economic transition
Sub-programme 2.4: Resources Activity 2.4: Resources Activity: Science awareness, infrastructure and international engagement
Activity: Business research, development and commercialisation
Activity: Business and market development
Sub-programme 2.5: Energy Activity 2.5: Energy Activity: Business research, development and commercialisation
Activity: Competitive marketplace
Activity: Business and market development
Sub-programme 2.6: Northern Australia Infrastructure Facility Activity 2.6: Northern Australia Infrastructure Facility  
Programme 3:
Programme Support
Purpose 3:
Streamlining Regulation
Purpose:
Streamlining Regulation
Sub-programme 3.1: Streamlining regulation Activity 3.1: Portfolio regulatory reform and functions Activity: Portfolio regulatory reform and functions
Sub-programme 3.2: Building a high performance organisation Capability
Building a high performance organisation1
Capability
Building a high performance organisation1
  1. Contributes to all three purposes.

Performance measurement framework

The department uses a hierarchy of performance criteria to measure and assess its performance. Three levels of performance criteria are applied to its ultimate outcome, intermediate outcome, and immediate outcome and output.

The department’s performance measurement framework is summarised in Table 3.

Table 3: Overview of the department’s performance measurement framework
Level of performance criteria Results-oriented performance measurement Performance criteria set out in the Portfolio Budget Statements Performance criteria set out in the corporate plan
Level 1 Ultimate outcome Measure and assess how Australia is performing with regard to the department’s outcome Measure and assess how Australia is performing with regard to the department’s vision
Level 2 Intermediate outcome Measure and assess the impacts of the department’s programmes Measure and assess the department’s performance in achieving its purposes
Level 3 Immediate outcome and output Measure and assess the effectiveness of the department’s sub-programmes and their components Measure and assess the effectiveness of the department’s activities and their components

In accordance with the requirements of the PGPA Act and Rules, the annual performance statements assess and report on the department’s performance in 2015–16 against the three levels of performance criteria set out in the 2015–16 PBS, 2015–16 PAES and 2015–16 Corporate Plan.

The level 1 and 2 performance criteria are used to monitor key trends and conditions within the areas of the department’s responsibility. These levels of performance criteria will generate performance information to achieve an improved understanding of “where we are” and “where we need to take action” in our effort to achieve the department’s outcome, vision and purposes.

The level 3 performance criteria are used to measure the effectiveness of the department’s activities and components, such as policy advice, initiatives, services, administered programmes, and projects. Through this level of performance criteria, we can assess and report on the department’s contributions to achieving the outcome, vision and purposes, attributable to specific activities and components.

Vision: Enabling Growth and Productivity for Globally Competitive Industries

Performance criteria for the three aspects of Australia’s economy relevant to the department’s vision are set out in the 2015–16 Corporate Plan. Table 4 assesses how aspects of the economy are performing, based on the latest available information. They provide context on the economic conditions in which the department operates and are not intended as direct measures of performance.

Table 4: Vision: Enabling Growth and Productivity for Globally Competitive Industries
Aspects of Australia’s economy relevant to the department’s vision Performance criterion Trends and analysis
Economic growth Growth in real gross domestic product2 Australia has a history of strong economic growth. Australia’s real GDP grew by 3.3 per cent through the year to the June quarter 2016. The Australian economy has now recorded its 25th consecutive year of GDP growth without a recession.
Growth in gross value added by industry3 Mining; Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services; Financial and Insurance Services; and Wholesale Trade were the standout industry performers during the year to the June quarter 2016. While demand for services is solid overall, there is significant variance between individual industries. Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing contracted by 3.3 per cent during the year, and Manufacturing and Administrative and Support Services also continued to decline in value.
Productivity Growth in labour productivity2 After several years of moderate growth in labour productivity, Australia’s labour productivity has recently accelerated. This is partly a result of significant investment in the mining sector generating large volumes of output. Australia’s labour productivity grew by 2.7 per cent through the year to the June quarter 2016.
Growth in multifactor productivity4 Australia’s multifactor productivity growth has been flat. Multifactor productivity growth was negative in 2014–15, declining by 0.07 per cent from 2013–14.
Export competitiveness1 Exports of goods and services5 Australian goods exports totalled $244 billion and services exports totalled $68 billion in the 12 months to June 2016. Growth in goods exports has declined over the last five years, with fluctuations in value over the period. In contrast, services exports have increased by 34 per cent since June 2011.
  1. The department has rationalised the criterion for this aspect by removing ‘share of global merchandise exports’.
  2. Source: ABS cat. no. 5206.0 table 1.
  3. Source: ABS cat. no. 5206.0 table 6.
  4. Source: ABS cat. no. 5260.0.55.002 tables 1 to 19.
  5. Source: ABS cat. no. 5368.0 table 1.

Purpose 1: Supporting Science and Commercialisation

Achieving this purpose involves facilitating the development and uptake of new ideas and technology, and translating them into commercial activity. It will increase productivity, improve Australia’s competitiveness and drive economic growth by delivering better scientific and economic outcomes for Australia.

The department works to achieve this purpose through two activities:

  • Activity 1.1: Science awareness, infrastructure and international engagement
  • Activity 1.2: Business research, development and commercialisation.

Main achievements

The department’s major contributions to fulfilling the purpose in 2015–16 included the following:

  • The department led delivery of the Australian Government’s National Innovation and Science Agenda, which was launched in December 2015. Strong progress was made on implementing many of the 24 measures under the agenda, including the Global Innovation Strategy, Innovation and Science Australia, and science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) literacy.
  • The department supported a comprehensive independent review of the R&D Tax Incentive—Australia’s largest innovation programme.
  • The department implemented the recommendations of the 2015 review of the Cooperative Research Centre (CRC) Programme through revised programme guidelines, which facilitated the first CRC-Projects funding round.
  • The department continued to facilitate investment in national research facilities. In early 2016, the Australian Government secured the future of the Australian Synchrotron by agreeing that ownership should transfer to the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation. The government has provided $519.8 million to operate the Synchrotron for the next decade. A total of $293.7 million was secured to fund the construction of the first phase of the Square Kilometre Array Radio Telescope Project.
  • The department took innovative approaches to bilateral international engagement on science, research and innovation, including piloting the Global Connections Fund and Australian French Entrepreneurial Challenge and developing the Global Innovation Strategy.
  • The National Measurement Institute maintained and evolved Australia’s measurement standards; provided leadership of the measurement system, including collaborating with researchers and industry and providing training; and responded to industry needs for high-quality measurement services.
  • Questacon delivered National Science Week 2015 and implemented the Inspiring Australia initiative, the reach and impact of which translate to engagement activity and STEM capacity-building across Australia.
  • The Australian Astronomical Observatory helped to establish remote observing stations in Western Australia and the Australian Capital Territory, allowing astronomers to use the Anglo-Australian Telescope without having to travel to Sydney or to the telescope site, saving time and money. In 2015–16, the Australian Astronomical Observatory published more than 150 research papers on its discoveries in the field of astronomy.

Performance criteria and results

Table 5: Purpose 1: Supporting Science and Commercialisation
Intended result1 Performance criterion Trends and analysis
Growth in the proportions of small, medium and large firms engaging in innovative activity Proportion of Australia’s businesses engaged in innovation2,4 The proportion of Australian businesses engaged in innovation decreased from 48.3 per cent in 2013−14 to 45.0 per cent in 2014−15. While Australia’s performance fluctuates across years, it remains higher than the OECD average when disaggregated into large and small to medium sized firms.
Increased investment by businesses in intangible assets—i.e. the knowledge assets of an organisation Business R&D expenditure as a percentage of GDP2,5

Business R&D as a percentage of GDP stood at 1.19 per cent in 2013–14, representing an increase over the last decade from 0.90 per cent in 2003–04, but a fall from the peak of 1.37 per cent recorded in 2008–09.

Investment in intangible capital by the private sector generally increased as a share of total GDP over the past decade, from 1.75 per cent in 2005 to 2.28 per cent in 2015, although this trend stalled in the last three years.

Growth in the value-added of knowledge-intensive industries Gross value added and employment by knowledge-intensive industries3,6

Gross value added of knowledge-intensive industries steadily increased by around 35.3 per cent over the decade from 2005 to 2015. Employment in the knowledge-intensive industries increased by 21.9 per cent over the same period.

Knowledge intensity measures the value of an industry’s stock of knowledge-based capital (intangible) as a proportion of its gross value added. Using this metric, the most knowledge intensive-industries in Australia are mining; professional, scientific and technical; information, media and telecommunications; manufacturing; and financial and insurance.

Improved returns from the commercialisation of research
  • Australian publicly funded research organisations commercialisation indicators2,7
  • Proportion of innovation-active businesses collaborating with universities or other non-commercial institutions2,8

The National Survey of Research Commercialisation found that Australian publicly funded research organisations entered into 15 463 research contracts, consultancies and collaborations in 2014, representing an increase of 26.5 per cent from the previous year. At the same time, the total value of the research contracts, consultancies and collaborations grew from $1598 million in 2013 to $1808 million in 2014.

The proportion of innovation-active businesses collaborating with universities or other non-commercial institutions was fairly low by OECD standards, at 2.1 per cent for small and medium-sized enterprises and 3 per cent for large firms in 2011, compared with 14.4 per cent and 36.6 per cent, respectively, for the OECD average.

Improvement in Australia’s performance in scientific research Share of world’s top 1 per cent of highly cited publications2,9 The share of Australia’s natural science and engineering publications in the world’s top 1 per cent of highly cited publications increased steadily over the past five years, from 5.0 per cent in 2010 to 6.9 per cent in 2015.
  1. Performance measures set out in the 2015–16 PBS.
  2. Performance measure set out in the 2015–16 Corporate Plan.
  3. New performance measure.
  4. Source: ABS cat.no. 8166.
  5. Source: ABS cat.no. 8104.
  6. Source: ABS cat. No. 5206.0, table 6 (see also Industry Monitor 2016).
  7. Source: Department of Industry, Innovation and Science (2016) National Survey of Research Commercialisation, 2016.
  8. Source: Department of industry, Innovation and Science (2015) Australian Innovation System Report, 2015.
  9. Source: InCites (2016) Thomson Reuters subscription database.
Table 6: Activity 1.1: Science awareness, infrastructure and international engagement
Contributing component Performance criterion 2015–16 target 2015–16 result Criterion source
Australian Astronomical Observatory (AAO) Number of research students supervised or funded by the AAO 39 39 2015–16 PBS
Number of users accessing AAO research facilities to facilitate and support research activities:      
AAO Telescope (Australian) 180 233 2015–16 PBS
International 8 metre access (overseas) 65 53 2015–16 PBS
Number of international visitors supported by the AAO Distinguished Visitor Scheme 5 5 2015–16 PBS
Number of international conferences and workshops supported by the AAO 3 3 2015–16 PBS
Australia–China Science and Research Fund; Australia–India Strategic Research Fund Number of collaborative research projects completed that reported strengthened international relationships 26

21

Five projects are still to be completed in 2016–17.

2015–16 PBS
Inspiring all Australians in STEM (Science for Australia’s Future—Inspiring Australia) Number of direct engagements supported by Inspiring Australia activities 1585 1722 2016–17 PBS1
Square Kilometre Array Radio Telescope Project Number of Australian companies/research institutions participating in the Square Kilometre Array Pre-Construction Work Programme 6 6 2015–16 PBS
Strategic investment in science Supporting the delivery of a whole-of-government approach to science policy through the Commonwealth Science Council, including establishment of science and research priorities and a strategic approach to investment

The Commonwealth Science Council held its third meeting on 21 October 2015.

National science and research priorities were announced in May 2015.

2015–16
Corporate Plan
Questacon Number of admissions to the Questacon Centre 445 000 487 691 2015–16
Corporate Plan
Number of participants in national programmes including the Questacon Technology Learning Centre 90 000 103 758 2015–16
Corporate Plan
National Measurement Institute Number of measurement services offered by the National Measurement Institute 4500 6559 2015–16
Corporate Plan
Percentage of reports, certificates and services delivered on time 85% 80% 2015–16
Corporate Plan
Percentage of trade measurement compliance targets met 90%

73%

Effort was redirected to emerging priority areas showing higher levels of non-compliance.

2015–16
Corporate Plan
  1. To address a data quality issue, the performance criterion and 2015–16 target for this component are sourced from the 2016–17 PBS instead of the 2015–16 PBS.
Table 7: Activity 1.2: Business research, development and commercialisation
Contributing component Performance criterion 2015–16 target 2015–16 result Criterion source
Cooperative Research Centres (CRCs) Programme Number of commercialisation agreements reported by the CRCs 211 Results for 2015–16 will not be available until 31 October 2016. 2015–16 PBS
Number of patents held/maintained by the CRCs 840 Results for 2015–16 will not be available until 31 October 2016. 2015–16 PBS
Number of applications for patents filed by the CRCs 69 Results for 2015–16 will not be available until 31 October 2016. 2015–16 PBS
Implementing the outcomes of the CRC programme review and ensuring ongoing future alignment with the government’s agenda Implementation of 16 of the 18 CRC Programme review recommendations was achieved through revised guidelines and CRC Advisory Committee activities. 2015–16
Corporate Plan
R&D Tax Incentive R&D expenditure registered with AusIndustry in order to claim the tax incentive or tax concession through their annual tax returns ($’000) 19 890 000

17 324 077

Data is as at 30 June 2016. The income period is still incomplete.

2015–16 PBS1
Number of entities registering R&D expenditure with AusIndustry in order to claim the tax incentive or tax concession through their annual tax returns 14 000

14 866

Data is as at 30 June 2016. The income period is still incomplete.

2015–16 PBS1
Boosting Commercial Returns from Research Facilitating better translation of research into commercial outcomes by leading the implementation of the Boosting the Commercial Returns from Research strategy Recommendations for which the department is responsible have been completed, except for one that is awaiting approval. 2015–16
Corporate Plan
  1. The 2015–16 target for this criterion was published in the 2016–17 PBS rather than the 2015–16 PBS because it was not available at the time of the 2015–16 PBS.

Evaluation results

In 2015–16, the department completed a number of evaluations:

  • The evaluation of the Australia–China Science and Research Fund found that 73 per cent, 93 per cent and 98 per cent of Joint Research Centre, Young Scientist and Group Mission participants, respectively, reported that the fund led to strengthened relationship with a Chinese research partner. Ten per cent of Group Mission and Joint Research Centre participants strongly agreed that their research led to a commercial development. One Joint Research Centre participant reported signing a memorandum of understanding with two Chinese hospitals on research, development and commercialisation of 3D printed biomedical devices.
  • The Inspiring Australia programme aims to build a strong, open relationship between science and society, underpinned by effective communication of science and its benefits. A 2015 review of Inspiring Australia’s Unlocking Australia’s Potential grants programme found that the initiative reached an estimated 470 000 people, with grants attracting $11 million in co-funding contributions from around 200 partner organisations.
  • In September 2014, the government announced an independent review of the CRC Programme, led by Mr David Miles AM. The review found the programme is valuable and effective, but has scope for improvement. The report made 18 recommendations, all of which were accepted by the government. The recommendations are being implemented through revised programme guidelines, released in December 2015. Changes to the guidelines instil a strong industry focus and include a new CRC-Projects funding stream, which supports short-term industry-led collaborative research with a focus on small and medium-sized enterprises.

Analysis of performance against Purpose 1

Measured by the performance criteria set out against the intended results, appreciable progress has been made towards the achievement of the purpose in recent years, particularly in enhancing performance in scientific research, remaining higher than the OECD average in innovative activities and improving economic returns on investment in public sector research. However, evidence shows that weak demand has slowed down business investment in intellectual property and R&D in Australia over recent years.

Purpose 2: Growing Business Investment and Improving Business Capability

Achieving this purpose involves building a diversified, flexible, resilient and dynamic economic base that can identify and adapt to new markets and emerging opportunities. It will drive Australia’s future prosperity and continued jobs growth by supporting the transformation of existing industries and the growth of new ones, enabling access to new markets and improving competition in existing markets.

The department works to achieve this purpose through six activities:

  • Activity 2.1: Competitive marketplace
  • Activity 2.2: Business and market development
  • Activity 2.3: Economic transition
  • Activity 2.4: Resources
  • Activity 2.5: Energy
  • Activity 2.6: Northern Australia Infrastructure Facility.

Main achievements

The department’s major contributions to fulfilling the purpose in 2015–16 included the following:

  • The Entrepreneurs’ Programme provided more than 5800 services to Australian businesses. The programme provided access to a national network of more than 100 experienced private sector advisers and facilitators, helping businesses improve their productivity and competitiveness.
  • Legislation to establish the Northern Australia Infrastructure Facility was passed by parliament on 3 May 2016. The facility was established from 1 July 2016, offering up to $5 billion in concessional financing to encourage and complement private sector investment in economic infrastructure in northern Australia.
  • The Industry Growth Centres Initiative is increasing collaboration and commercialisation, building management and workforce skills, improving capabilities to engage with global supply chains and international markets, and addressing the regulatory cost on industry. The five original Industry Growth Centres are operational. The Cyber Security Growth Centre, announced as part of the National Innovation and Science Agenda in December 2015, is identifying priority areas for action and determining its operating model.
  • The Anti-Dumping Commission reviewed its administration arrangements, putting in place a new investigation model to create efficiencies and improve the quality and timeliness of anti-dumping investigations.
  • The department’s whole-of-government SmartForms Service is driving digital transformation. The service facilitated more than 500 000 businesses-to-government (B2G) digital transactions in 2015–16.
  • The Business Grants Hub has been streamlining the design and implementation of business grants programmes across government through a centre of excellence in grants administration, making it easier for businesses to access government services.
  • As part of the department’s efforts to make it easier for business to connect with government services, business.gov.au was redeveloped taking a user-centred approach. The new site was released on 9 May 2016.
  • The Automotive Diversification Programme and Next Generation Manufacturing Investment Programme are key components of the $155 million Growth Fund established to assist workers, businesses and regions affected by closures in the automotive industry. During 2015–16, the department awarded 46 new grants to businesses totalling $67 million under these two programmes.
  • The department led the development of the National Energy Productivity Plan, which sets out a policy framework and work plan to lift Australia’s energy productivity by up to 40 per cent by 2030.
  • The department commissioned an ACCC inquiry into the east coast wholesale gas markets in response to business concerns about gas prices and market transparency. The inquiry was completed in April 2016 and the findings will inform the Council of Australian Governments’ (COAG) Energy Council’s gas market reform agenda.
  • The department provided significant secretariat support to the Independent Review of Governance Arrangements for Australia’s Energy Markets. The COAG Energy Council agreed to improve the way the Council, its officials and institutions operate including reprioritising its reform agenda to four strategic themes: (i) emerging technologies; (ii) integration of energy and carbon policies; (iii) energy supply and development; (iv) modernisation of regulatory frameworks.
  • The department developed a prioritisation plan for the Equipment Energy Efficiency (E3) Program Committee. The work plan targets the highest emission intensive appliances such as lighting, swimming pool pumps and air conditioning. The E3 Program is designed to increase the energy efficiency of new appliances and equipment sold in Australia and New Zealand, thereby reducing energy consumption (energyrating.gov.au/document/e3-prioritisation-plan).
  • The department led the development of the COAG Energy Council Gas Supply Strategy that was agreed in December 2015. Through this Strategy jurisdictions have committed to improving collaborative efforts on scientific and regulatory issues associated with onshore gas.
  • The $100.5 million Exploring for the Future Programme will produce a minerals, energy and groundwater resources prospectus for selected regions of northern Australia and parts of South Australia. It will reduce the technical risk of exploration in areas that have resource potential but require new geoscience data. This new information will enable industry to explore and invest with confidence to identify major new gas, minerals, and groundwater resources.

Performance criteria and results

Table 8: Purpose 2: Growing Business Investment and Improving Business Capability
Intended result1 Performance criterion Trends and analysis
Growth in new private sector investment Private gross fixed capital formation2,4

Annual business investment growth, measured by private gross fixed capital formation, has been negative since 2013, and fell by 2.90 per cent between June 2015 and June 2016.

The recent fall in business investment is attributable to the winding back of mining investment, with other sectors and industries unable to make up the shortfall. This is inevitable given that mining investment reached record-high levels.

Increased foreign direct investment in Australia Foreign direct investment as a share of annual GDP2,5 The flow of foreign direct investment to Australia was $49 billion in 2015, which contributed to a year-end stock of foreign direct investment of $735 billion. Growth in foreign direct investment was significant over the past 10 years in absolute terms and as a proportion of GDP. The stock of foreign direct investment increased from 27 per cent of GDP in 2005 to 45 per cent of GDP in 2015.
Improvement in Australia’s ranking in international performance indices
  • Australia’s ranking in World Bank ease of doing business index3,6
  • Australia’s ranking in Global Innovation Index3,7
  • Australia’s ranking in the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) indicator of total early-stage entrepreneurship activity3,8

Australia recorded a slight improvement in its ranking in selected international performance indices over recent years.

The World Bank ease of doing business index measures the quality and efficiency of business regulations that affect 11 areas of the life of a business. Australia ranked 13th out of 189 countries in 2016, compared with 15th out of 183 countries in 2012.

The Global Innovation Index aims to capture the multi-dimensional facets of innovation and ranks economies’ innovation capabilities. Australia ranked 17th out of 141 economies in 2015, an improvement from 23rd in 2012.

The GEM indicator of total early-stage entrepreneurship activity provides a measure of the level of new enterprise creation in the economy. Australia ranked 24th out of 60 economies in 2015, an improvement from 31st out of 59 economies in 2010.

  1. Performance measures set out in the 2015–16 PBS.
  2. Performance measure set out in the 2015–16 Corporate Plan.
  3. New performance measure. Previous performance criterion ‘Forward and backward participation in global value chains’ has been replaced by a range of new criteria.
  4. Source: ABS cat. no. 5206.0 table 6.
  5. Source: ABS cat. no. 5206.0, table 1 and ABS cat. no. 5352.0, table 1.
  6. Source: World Bank Group (2015), Doing Business Indicators, 2012 and 2016, custom query, Viewed 1 January 2016,
    www.doingbusiness.org/custom-query.
  7. Source: Cornell University (2015) INSEAD, the World Intellectual Property Organization, Global Innovation Index 2015, Viewed 9 September 2016, www.globalinnovationindex.org.
  8. Source: Global Entrepreneurship Research Association (GERA) (2016) Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM), 2015−16, Adult Population Survey.
Table 9: Activity 2.1: Competitive marketplace
Contributing component Performance criterion 2015–16 target 2015–16 result Criterion source
Certain Inputs to Manufacture; Enhanced Project By-law Scheme; Space Concession Number of new duty and/or tax registrations for Certain Inputs to Manufacture, Enhanced Project By-law Scheme and Space Concession 13 14 2015–16 PBS
Total value of duty and/or tax concessions to eligible firms ($’000) 277 500 340 322 2015–16 PBS
Tradex Number of active Tradex order users 615 633 2015–16 PBS
Value of duty and/or tax concessions to eligible firms ($’000) 195 000 220 635 2015–16 PBS
Textile Clothing and Footwear —Register of Approved Occupational Clothing Proportion of registrations within 30 days of complete information being provided 90% 99% 2015–16 PBS
Support for Industry Service Organisations Memberships of key international standardisation and conformity assessment bodies maintained Standards Australia maintained membership of the International Organization for Standardization and the International Electrotechnical Commission. The National Association of Testing Authorities maintained membership of the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation and the Asia Pacific Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation. 2015–16 PBS
Trade Policy, Standards and Conformation Supporting the internationalisation of Australian industry, encouraging Australia’s multilateral and bilateral industry and trade cooperation, and managing the Commonwealth’s relationships with standards and conformity assessment bodies The department supported the internationalisation of Australian industry through the development and implementation of free trade agreements and through committees of the World Trade Organization and APEC. Standards Australia and the National Association of Testing Authorities met the activities and conditions of their respective memoranda of understanding and funding agreements. The Joint Accreditation System of Australia and New Zealand also met its performance requirements set out in its statement of corporate intent and annual report. 2015–16
Corporate Plan
Anti-Dumping Commission Completing and implementing the anti-dumping reviews to support Australian industries through more effective anti-dumping measures and reforms The anti-dumping review was completed. The department is currently implementing the review’s recommendations. 2015–16 
Corporate Plan
Proportion of appeals (to the Anti-Dumping Review Panel and Federal Court) that affirm the Anti-Dumping Commissioner’s or relevant minister’s findings 80% Of the appeals heard, 42 per cent completely affirmed the findings and 33 per cent partially affirmed the findings. 2015–16 
Corporate Plan
Proportion of preliminary affirmative determinations, or status reports explaining that there is insufficient ground to issue a preliminary affirmative determination, made from day 60 of an anti-dumping /countervailing investigation 100% 100% 2015–16 
Corporate Plan
Proportion of anti-dumping inquiries to the business.gov.au hotline and the client support area responded to within client service standards 90% 95% 2015–16
Corporate Plan
Table 10: Activity 2.2: Business and market development
Contributing component Performance criterion 2015–16 target 2015–16 result Criterion source
Asialink Business Number of courses run on Asia capability development 5 36 2015–16 PBS
Number of events held promoting and building Asia capabilities 50 57 2015–16 PBS
Industry Growth Centres Initiative Established Industry Growth Centres are undertaking strategic activities to improve the innovation, productivity and competitiveness of their respective sectors

Industry Growth Centres undertook a range of activities aligned with their broad expected outcomes, including:

  • conducting 24 workshops (246 participants) that facilitated collaboration and innovation to tackle technical challenges, develop new products and find significant savings
  • conducting 28 workshops (425 participants) to build knowledge and skills on key e-commerce and export capabilities
  • supporting 11 collaborative research–industry projects generating products with potential sales of more than $7 million; two of these companies have already made export sales of these products
  • agreeing on two memoranda of understanding with Cooperative Research Centres
  • developing an online searchable tool enabling international buyers to source Australian export-ready suppliers, with around 1100 international buyers registered from more than 50 countries
  • establishing a hub to support skills sharing and development
  • developing an online directory of capabilities to enable better intra-industry linkages
  • helping more than 150 Australian brands promote their products at three international trade shows
  • with CSIRO, running the Enterprise Solution Centre to connect companies to technical and research expertise—to date, 46 small and medium enterprises have generated products with potential sales of over $50 million
  • forming a National Additive Manufacturing Collaboration Hub and a National Carbon Fibre Manufacturing Collaboration Hub
  • with peak body Austmine, running the “Co-Lab” programme to enable industry participants to brainstorm opportunities.
2015–16 PAES
Entrepreneurs’ Programme Number of services provided to strengthen business management and networks, enhance research collaborations and facilitate commercialisation of novel products, processes and services 5360 5896 2015–16 PBS
Expediting Clinical Trial Reform in Australia Establishment of an interactive clinical trials web portal and a framework for education and training on governance for clinical trials

The interactive portal was established and went live on 20 May 2016, International Clinical Trials Day. Since then, 3000 potential participants for clinical trials have subscribed to the web portal. Pharmaceutical companies sponsoring trials are actively promoting the website and its interactive portal. Overall, in 2015−16 the website had almost 100 000 visits.

The department commissioned a nationally accredited vocational education and training course, which has been piloted.

2015–16 PBS
Leveraging Australia’s Global Expat Platform—Advance Project milestones are achieved and appropriate reports are submitted Biannual assessments of progress and financial reports were completed. All project milestones were achieved and appropriate reports submitted. 2015–16 PBS
Sectoral Growth Policy Providing sound advice on sectoral policy issues relating to manufacturing and services, and working with businesses and stakeholders across a number of different industry sectors to drive national economic growth, productivity and competitiveness

Key achievements in 2015–16 included:

  • extending the Major Projects Approval Agency into the Northern Territory
  • contributing to the establishment of five Industry Growth Centres
  • completing the review of the Disability (Building Access to Premises) Standards
  • implementing reforms to the Enhanced Project By-law Scheme to remove duplication
  • implementing and completing the Home Insulation Program Industry Payment Scheme.
2015–16
Corporate Plan
Single Business Services Number of business.gov.au website unique page views (million) 51.3 53.6 2015–16
Corporate Plan
Table 11: Activity 2.3: Economic transition
Contributing component Performance criterion 2015–16 target 2015–16 result Criterion source
Australian Government Innovation and Investment Fund (Tasmania) Induced private sector investment in new or expanded business activity ($’000) 5005 5005 2015–16 PBS
Tasmanian Jobs and Investment Fund Induced private sector investment in new or expanded business activity ($’000) 10 000 10 000 2015–16 PBS
Automotive Diversification Programme Induced private sector investment in new or expanded activity by the Australian automotive supply chain ($’000) 20 000 20 515 2015–16 PBS
Automotive Transformation Scheme Total value of plant and equipment and innovation investment by Australian automotive industry induced by the Automotive Transformation Scheme ($’000) 547 616 602 140 2015–16 PBS
Manufacturing Transition Grants Programme Induced private sector investment in new or expanded business activity ($’000) 105 200

61 818

The result is lower than the target because a number of projects have been delayed.

2015–16 PBS
Next Generation Manufacturing Investment Programme Induced private sector investment in new or expanded business activity 19 000

12 895

The result is lower than the target because a number of projects have been delayed.

2015–16 PBS
Regional Infrastructure Programme Induced private sector investment in infrastructure to enhance economic activity in the region Not applicable.

 

Funding for the Regional Infrastructure Programme was reallocated to the Next Generation Manufacturing Investment Programme.

2015–16 PBS
Toyota Major Facelift Vehicle Grant; Toyota Supplier Development Programme Grant Total amount of investment by Toyota induced by the grants ($’000) 15 100 6998

 

Favourable exchange conditions and engineering efficiencies allowed Toyota to complete the project with an underspend.

2015–16 PBS
Victorian Innovation and Investment Fund—Ford assistance Number of jobs created from projects 800

394

Targets were set before the extension of the programme. Also, a series of large grants have been terminated, while many grantees have struggled to create jobs as quickly as originally projected.

2015–16 PBS
Amount of private sector investment induced by the Victorian Innovation and Investment Fund—Ford assistance ($’000) 130 000

68 844

Targets were set before the extension of the programme. Also, a series of large grants have been terminated, while many grantees have struggled to create jobs as quickly as originally projected.

2015–16 PBS
Table 12: Activity 2.4: Resources
Contributing component Performance criterion 2015–16 target 2015–16 result Criterion source
Offshore Minerals Act 1994 Percentage of Offshore Minerals Act 1994 fees received paid to states/Northern Territory for administration 100%

Not applicable,

No applications were lodged under the Act in 2015–16.

2015–16 PBS
Petroleum Royalties Administration Timely and accurate delivery of audit and monthly administration and verification of royalties The department achieved accurate and timely administrative functions for Commonwealth revenue and expenses pertaining to the North West Shelf Project royalty, the onshore coastal waters royalty, the resource rent royalty, and Australia’s entitlement to petroleum extracted within the Joint Petroleum Development Area. 2015–16 PBS
NT Uranium Royalty (Ranger Project Area) Administration (including specific purpose payment) Efficient and effective biannual collection, payment and reconciliation of uranium royalties Biannual collection, payment and reconciliation of NT uranium royalties were completed. 2015–16 PBS
Royalty Payments WA — Offshore Petroleum and Greenhouse Gas Storage Act 2006 (specific purpose payment) Timely and accurate calculation, verification and advice to the Commonwealth Treasury of the amount payable to Western Australia The department achieved accurate and timely administrative and verification functions for expenses pertaining to Western Australia’s entitlement to royalties from the North West Shelf Project and compensation payable to Western Australia as a result of the removal of the condensate excise exemption in May 2008. 2015–16 PBS
Maralinga Maintenance Effective management of the Maralinga section 400 in line with obligations under the 2009 Handback Deed A new standard operating procedure was put in place. One committee meeting was held and one site visit was undertaken to Maralinga. 2015–16 PBS
Radioactive Waste Management Effective delivery of activities supporting the government’s radioactive waste management strategy The department reviewed 28 site nominations and announced six-shortlisted sites in November 2015. The department held 120 community consultation sessions between November 2015 and March 2016. A single site was identified for consideration and community consultations. 2015–16 PBS
Rum Jungle Mine Site—Environmental Rehab (specific purpose payment) Effective delivery of scheduled activities for the Rum Jungle Mine Site Rehabilitation Project The target was partially achieved. The Northern Territory’s outputs were delivered under the Project Agreement for the Management of the Former Rum Jungle Mine Site (Stage 2). A detailed business case is to be developed by late 2016 using Northern Territory inputs and work being conducted in the second half of 2016. 2015–16 PBS
Syntroleum Depreciation The Syntroleum depreciation schedule is administered in accordance with the government agreement and no material errors are made Syntroleum has been fully depreciated in accordance with the government agreement and no material errors were made. 2015–16 PBS
Low Emissions Technology Demonstration Fund Number of companies investing in innovation supported through the Low Emissions Technology Demonstration Fund 1 1 2015–16 PBS
Carbon Capture and Storage Flagships Number of companies supported for the development of carbon capture and storage technologies 5 12 2015–16 PBS
National Low Emissions Coal Initiative Number of projects supported for the development and deployment of low emissions coal technologies 2 2 2015–16 PBS
Competitive and sustainable resource industries Providing sound policy advice to support the growth of resources industries and ensure an adequate return to the Australian community through policies and analysis in the resource sector1 The department provided regular and timely advice on issues affecting the resources sector both domestically and internationally including the development of low emissions technologies, progress in Australia’s mining sector and coal standards in China. 2015–16
Corporate Plan
National Offshore Petroleum Titles Administrator Administering national offshore petroleum titles, undertaking data and resource management, and providing technical advice to the Joint Authority through the National Offshore Petroleum Titles Administrator (NOPTA) The ministerial operational review of NOPTA found that NOPTA is effective in contributing to the efficiency of the decision-making by a Joint Authority for a state or the Northern Territory. 2015–16
Corporate Plan
  1. This criterion has been modified to remove the reference to the National Energy Productivity Plan, which is now reported under the component ‘Efficient and sustainable energy market’ in Activity 2.5.
Table 13: Activity 2.5: Energy
Contributing component Performance criterion 2015–16 target 2015–16 result Criterion source
Greenhouse and Energy Minimum Standards National Legislative Framework Number of regulatory services to improve energy efficiency and labelling standards for appliances and other products:      
  • Number of new product profiles published
5

2

Only two new products were released in the appliance market with an Australian and/or New Zealand energy efficiency standard or regulation in 2015–16. The department has profiled and published both of them.

2015–16 PBS
  • Number of new Consultation Regulatory Impact Statements published
5

1

Development of new Consultation Regulatory Impact Statements is contingent on agreement from all Australian states and territories and the New Zealand Government.

2015–16 PBS
  • Number of new products registered under the Greenhouse and Energy Minimum Standards Act 2012
4500 5027 2015–16 PBS
Effective implementation of the Equipment Energy Efficiency Programme under the Greenhouse and Energy Minimum Standards Act 2012 77 per cent of survey respondents were satisfied with the level of service they received. 2015–16 PBS
Coal Mining Abatement Technology Support Package Number of co-funded projects developing and demonstrating technologies funded under the Coal Mining Abatement Technology Support Package 6 6 2015–16 PBS
Energy Efficiency Programmes Effective delivery of activities to support improved energy productivity of Australia’s residential and commercial building stock

The department contributed to energy productivity improvements in the commercial and residential building stock through:

  • changes to the Commercial Building Disclosure Program to include smaller commercial office spaces
  • launch of the Design for Place free 7-star house plans
  • improvements to the Nationwide House Energy Rating Scheme to improve consistency
  • progress on improving compliance with minimum building standards.

Commercial and residential activities have been integrated into the National Energy Productivity Plan.

2015–16 PBS
Maintain Commonwealth contribution to the ongoing development and improvement of the National Australian Built Environment Rating System (NABERS) which underpins the Commercial Building Disclosure Program The department directly supported the development of new tools to improve energy efficiency of new shopping centres, data centres and hotels. 2015–16 PBS
Efficient and sustainable energy markets Providing sound policy advice to support the safe and sustainable operations of energy markets to provide reliable and lowest cost outcomes for customers. Developing a National Energy Productivity Plan to deliver up to a 40 per cent increase in Australia’s energy productivity by 2030.

The department provided policy advice to support the Minister for Energy’s role as chair of the Council of Australian Governments’ Energy Council. The department led the development of the Energy Council’s National Energy Productivity Plan, Equipment Energy Efficiency Prioritisation Plan and Gas Supply Strategy.

The department is implementing the recommendations from the independent review of governance arrangements for Australia’s energy markets, including reprioritising the Energy Council’s agenda.

The department also provided technical and policy advice to the West Australian and Northern Territory governments on adopting national energy laws to encourage consistency and harmonisation.

2015–16
Corporate Plan
National Energy Security Assessment Effective management of electricity and gas emergency response arrangements, and transport fuel supply which is under the administration of the Liquid Fuel Emergency Act 19841 The department worked with states and territories and industry on emergency response and preparedness to effectively manage electricity, gas and transport fuel supply by contributing to relevant emergency management, response and preparedness meetings. 2015–16
Corporate Plan
  1. The performance criterion has been slightly reworded to improve clarity.
Table 14: Activity 2.6: Northern Australia Infrastructure Facility
Contributing component Performance criterion 2015–16 target 2015–16 result Criterion source
Northern Australia Infrastructure Facility To be developed following finalisation of the programme design and consultation with stakeholders Performance criteria are under development 2015–16 PAES

Evaluation results

In 2015–16, the department completed an evaluation of the Energy Efficiency Information Grants Program. The programme’s objective was to empower small and medium-sized businesses and community organisations to make informed decisions about energy efficiency—and thereby reduce their operational costs. The evaluation found that the proportion of businesses and community organisations thinking they are well informed about ‘the steps you can take to be smarter in your energy use and controlling energy costs’ rose from 46 per cent before the start of the programme to 65 per cent post-programme—and those that had energy assessments (i.e. audits) achieved a higher result at 80 per cent.

Analysis of performance against Purpose 2

Measured by the performance criteria set out against the intended results, steady progress has been recorded in recent years towards the achievement of the purpose, particularly in enhancing the quality and efficiency of business regulations and improving innovation capability. However, business investment has been falling since 2013, which is attributable to the winding back of mining investment, with other sectors and industries unable to make up the shortfall.

Purpose 3: Streamlining Regulation

Achieving this purpose involves reducing the cost of doing business, facilitating innovation and ensuring that the regulatory environment strikes the right balance between efficient markets and community expectations. It will boost productivity and enhance Australia’s international competitiveness by reducing the burden on industry of inefficient regulation and improving the delivery of programmes.

The department works to achieve this purpose through one activity:

  • Activity 3.1: Portfolio regulatory reform and functions.

Main achievements

The department’s major contributions to fulfilling the purpose in 2015–16 included the following:

  • Significant reforms to Australia’s country of origin labelling laws were implemented to give consumers clearer information about the origin of food without imposing excessive regulatory costs on businesses. The reform package also delivered a national information campaign and an innovative online labelling tool for businesses.
  • As part of the Australian Taxation Office–led small business fix-it squads, business.gov.au was updated to make it easier for small businesses to sell, close down, incorporate or take on employees. The website provides a single source for information on the processes businesses need to follow, making it easier to comply with the relevant regulations.
  • The National Measurement Institute has progressed work to update Australia’s legal metrology regulatory framework towards an outcome-focused, principles-based legislative structure where operational methodologies will be transparently underpinned by risk and harm analysis.

Performance criteria and results

Table 15: Purpose 3: Streamlining Regulation
Intended result1 Performance criterion Trends and analysis
The quality of regulation (measured via domestic and international reviews)
  • World Bank ease of doing business rankings for Australia2,4
  • Australia’s ranking by the OECD product market regulation index3,5

Australia ranked 13th out of 189 countries in 2016, compared with 15th out of 183 countries in 2012, in the World Bank’s ease of doing business index.

The OECD indicators of product market regulation are comprehensive and internationally comparable measures of the degree to which policies promote or inhibit competition.

Australia’s ranking by the OECD product market regulation index worsened between 2003 and 2008 and then improved in 2013. The most recent ranking (8th) means that Australia is close to the world leaders.

Business and government satisfaction with delivery of regulation reform
  • Business reporting on the cost of compliance with certain activities2
  • Portfolio net regulatory reduction for business3
The department has undertaken a range of initiatives to help ensure business and government satisfaction with the delivery of regulation reform. The portfolio achieved a net regulatory reduction for business of $166.6 million in 2015.
  1. Performance measures set out in the 2015–16 Portfolio Budget Statements.
  2. Performance measure set out in the 2015–16 Corporate Plan.
  3. New performance measure.
  4. Source: World Bank Group (2015), Doing Business Indicators, 2012 and 2016, custom query, Viewed 1 January 2016, www.doingbusiness.org/custom-query.
  5. Source: OECD (2013) OECD statistics, Public Sector, Taxation and Market Regulation, Market Regulation, economy-wide regulation, Product Market Regulation, 2013, Viewed 1 December 2015, stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx?DataSetCode=PMR.
Table 16: Activity 3.1: Portfolio regulatory reform and functions
Contributing component Performance criterion 2015–16 target 2015–16 result Criterion source
Regulatory policy advice Provision of high-quality, timely and strategic industry policy advice to support the government’s deregulation agenda

The department put in place a framework to support the implementation of the government’s deregulation agenda. Key implementation tasks included: encouraging cultural change based on reduced reliance on regulation; improving communication with key portfolio stakeholders; providing advice and support to portfolio business areas; and providing the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet with regular reports on progress towards savings targets.

The Australian National Audit Office report Implementing the deregulation agenda: cutting red tape (report 29 of 2015–16) noted that the department had clearly articulated roles and responsibilities consistent with the guidance issued by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet and had established suitable internal governance and administrative arrangements to facilitate implementation of the government’s deregulation agenda.

2015–16 PBS
Portfolio regulatory reform Successful implementation of portfolio regulatory reform The portfolio achieved a net regulatory reduction for business of $166.6 million in 2015, significantly exceeding the allocated savings target. Additional performance information can be found in the Australian Government Annual Red Tape Reduction Report 2015 on the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet website. 2015–16 PBS

Analysis of performance against Purpose 3

Measured by the performance criteria set out against the intended results, progress has been made towards the achievement of the purpose, particularly in meeting the portfolio regulatory saving targets and improving the quality of regulation. Since the introduction of the government’s Regulatory Reform Agenda in October 2013, the department has contributed an estimated $370 million in regulatory savings.

Capability: Building a high performance organisation

To achieve its purposes and realise its vision, the department invests in its people, processes and systems. Building a high performance organisation involves promoting and improving:

  • staff understanding of the department’s role
  • stakeholder and peer recognition of the role the department plays in matters relevant to Australia’s industries
  • business satisfaction with the delivery of programme services
  • satisfaction with the delivery of internal enabling and support services
  • overall productivity.

Performance criteria and results

Table 17: Capability: Building a high performance organisation
Contributing component Performance criterion 2015–16 target 2015–16 result Criterion source
General policy advice on matters impacting on the industry Provision of high-quality, timely and strategic industry policy advice to the Minister

Most of the department’s significant achievements in policy advice in 2015–16 have already been presented in various parts of these statements.

In addition, the Office of the Chief Economist’s paper The employment dynamics of Australian entrepreneurship was highly influential in the development of the National Innovation and Science Agenda. The paper showed the influence of start-ups on net job creation in Australia and helped create an evidence-based narrative about policy support for start-ups.

2015–16 PBS
General programme delivery designed to have a positive impact on industry Effective and efficient delivery of programmes that support government industry policy

Most of the department’s significant achievements in programme delivery in 2015–16 have already been presented in various parts of these statements.

In addition:

  • as part of a whole of Government initiative to streamline and simplify grant processes across agencies, the department was selected to operate one of two Australian government grants administration hubs, with the department’s grants hub focusing on businesses
  • the Defence Industry Innovation Centre provided more than 180 services to Australian businesses in 2015–16. The centre will be significantly enhanced by the implementation of measures in the Defence White Paper and Defence Industry Policy Statement, including the implementation and launch of the Centre for Defence Industry Capability.
2015–16 PBS
Corporate, financial and ICT services Effective and efficient provision of corporate, financial and ICT services

Significant achievements included:

  • implementation of the Corporate Network Reform Programme, including streamlining and process improvement across the network, which has delivered significant capability efficiencies and enhancements to corporate services
  • development and delivery of the department’s strategy for shared and common services
  • approval and implementation of the department’s new enterprise agreement
  • the establishment of BizLab—an internal innovation hub that will work to find better solutions for businesses and the department and, in doing so, build design thinking capability across the department
  • the ongoing provision of effective learning and development opportunities for staff. This was reflected in the 2016 State of the Service census results
  • the creation of the information management programme of work to address the transition to digital information governance and compliance with the Whole-of-Government Digital Continuity 2020 Policy
  • delivery of a new platform which gives the department a single view of its customer information.
2015–16 PBS

Financial performance

Financial Performance – Departmental

Operating Result

Excluding depreciation and amortisation, the department recorded a loss of $6.5 million in 2015–16.

After taking into account depreciation and amortisation of $42.3 million, the department recorded a loss of $48.8 million for 2015–16. This reflects the introduction of the cash appropriation arrangements where appropriation for depreciation and amortisation expenses ceased. Entities now receive a separate capital budget provided through equity appropriations.

Financial Sustainability

As at 30 June 2016, the department reported net assets of $243.2 million.

The department has sufficient financial assets to settle its payables as and when they fall due. Non-financial assets consist mainly of property (buildings and fit-out), plant and equipment owned by the department.

Financial Performance – Administered

Income

Administered revenue largely relates to royalty revenue ($979 million), dividends issued by Snowy Hydro Limited ($23.6 million), levy receipts generated by the National Offshore and Petroleum Safety and Environmental Management Authority ($28.9 million) and registration fees generated by the National Offshore Petroleum Titles Administrator ($9.1 million).

Expenses

During the year the department administered programmes on behalf of the government, including:

  • $165.6 million to facilitate the development and commercialisation of new ideas and technology to deliver better scientific and economic outcomes for Australia
  • $213.1 million to contribute to building a diversified, flexible, resilient and dynamic economic business environment in which business can compete and grow
  • $18.5 million to support the sustainable development of the resources sector, attract private sector investment and encourage innovative technologies
  • $30.2 million to support the safe and sustainable operations of energy markets and improve Australia’s energy performance and productivity
  • $991.0 million in payments to the portfolio’s corporate Commonwealth entities: the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation; the Australian Renewable Energy Agency; the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation; the Australian Institute of Marine Science; and the National Offshore Petroleum Safety and Environmental Management Authority.